Namibia launches elephant conservation, management plan for next decade #SootinClaimon.Com

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Namibia on Friday launched a national elephant conservation and management plan for the next 10 years.

Namibia on Friday launched a national elephant conservation and management plan for the next 10 years.

Speaking at the launch, Environment Minister Pohamba Shifeta said elephants have not just increased in numbers, but have also expanded in range and are now found in areas where they went locally extinct more than 70 years ago.

“We are devolving… management of elephants to the local level structures headed by regional managers,” he said. “These structures will be empowered to come up with innovative, locally accepted measures and actions to manage elephants occurring in those specific areas.”

File photo taken on Aug. 26, 2016 shows elephants at the Etosha National Park, northwestern Namibia. (Xinhua/Wu Changwei)File photo taken on Aug. 26, 2016 shows elephants at the Etosha National Park, northwestern Namibia. (Xinhua/Wu Changwei)

Shifeta also launched the Wildlife Corridors Strategy, which provides for the management and protection of wildlife movement routes or corridors that need to be kept open but limit direct contact between people and wildlife in order to reduce human-wildlife conflict and promote biodiversity conservation and wildlife economy.

Five wildlife corridors or wildlife dispersal areas in the northeast Zambezi region have been identified.  

Published : October 24, 2021

By : Xinhua

BACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-Uparaj #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40007881


The Bangkok Art and Culture Centre (BACC) finally opened its doors to the public on Friday with an exhibition showcasing the works of late National Artist Damrong Wong-Uparaj.

“Damrong Wong-Uparaj: A Retrospective of Versatility and Discipline” features 70 paintings and prints portraying the artist’s changing viewpoints in each year of his life. The exhibition runs until December 5.

The late artist’s works were meant to go on display officially in April but had to be postponed due to Covid-related national lockdowns.

Though BACC opened on October 1 when measures were relaxed, it did not launch the exhibition’s opening ceremony until Friday.

Damrong’s career spanned more than 40 years and he was best known for his lively depictions of Thai rural life captured through the modern palette. He died aged 66 in 2002.

By Thanachart Chuengyaempin

BACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-UparajBACC opens with dedication to late National Artist Damgrong Wong-Uparaj

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Bangkok’s art scene in the pandemic era

Published : October 23, 2021

By : THE NATION

Egypt launches 1st intl art exhibition at Giza Pyramids #SootinClaimon.Com

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“In Forever Is Now exhibition, I believe Forever refers to the Great Pyramids with their magnificence and antiquity, and Now signifies temporary art,” said Ahmed Obied, assistant minister of tourism and antiquities.

Egypt launched on Thursday the first international art exhibition at the Great Pyramids of Giza and their surrounding plateau with the participation of artists from Egypt and other countries.

The event “Forever Is Now” is organized by Art D’Egypte company, an Egyptian platform for art and heritage, under the auspices of Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities and Ministry of Foreign Affairs as well as the patronage of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

“Today, we see a mix between the Egyptian civilization and contemporary art around the world. This is surely very important because it represents exchanges among cultures and dialogues between contemporary artists and our civilization,” said Nadine Abdel-Ghaffar, founder of Art D’Egypte.

The international gallery features the sculptures and artworks of the artists in open space around the pyramids.

Visitors pose for photos with an artwork during an international art exhibition in Giza, Egypt, on Oct. 21, 2021. (Xinhua/Ahmed Gomaa)Visitors pose for photos with an artwork during an international art exhibition in Giza, Egypt, on Oct. 21, 2021. (Xinhua/Ahmed Gomaa)

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Abdel-Ghaffar noted that it is a new experience to hold such an open-air art exhibition in Egypt and her team ensured preserving the archeological site while installing the sculptures of the artists, which took more than a year of preparation.

“The exhibition is a message of hope for humanity, particularly amid COVID-19 pandemic while many countries impose lockdowns,” she told Xinhua.

Visitors gather in front of Italian artist Lorenzo QuinnVisitors gather in front of Italian artist Lorenzo Quinn

Among the displayed works is a sculpture made of stainless steel rods entitled “Together” by Italian artist Lorenzo Quinn, which features two hands rising and touching each other by the tips of fingers to symbolize communication.

The Great Pyramids of Giza can just be seen in a distance behind Quinn’s work. “I am very lucky to have the three pyramids behind my sculpture. The position of the hands touching each other like this also looks like a pyramid shape, which is why I made the hands this way,” the sculptor explained in front of his work.

He noted that he used stainless steel wire mesh with 36,000 welding points and the work took him nine months.

Another work was from Egyptian artist Moataz Nasr, which shows dozens of paddles of a solar boat crossed in X shape to form a 14-meter-long boat-like structure, with a lower passage where visitors can walk in and face a kind of a bottleneck while going through.

“The piece is entitled ‘Barzakh,’ which means a divide, or a spot between two different worlds like life and death, day and night or black and white, while a solar boat for ancient Egyptians was meant to take them from this world to the afterlife,” the Egyptian artist explained.

Meanwhile, opposite to one of the pyramids, two British artists Edward Shuster and Claudia Moseley teamed up to present their joint work “Plan of the Path of Light.”

It is a number of hand-bonded optical glass figures with steel bases, one of which looks like a glass pyramid.

Behind the abstract simplicity of the forms is a matrix of symbolic angles, measures and orientations, inspired by the optico-geometric magic of the Great Pyramid, the two artists said.

“We tried to take all the symbolism and cosmic mathematics of the pyramids and include them in this new contemporary form,” Shuster told Xinhua.

“In ‘Forever Is Now’ exhibition, I believe ‘Forever’ refers to the Great Pyramids with their magnificence and antiquity, and ‘Now’ signifies temporary art,” Ahmed Obied, assistant minister of tourism and antiquities, told Xinhua at the pyramids plateau.

Visitors view Egyptian artist Moataz NasrVisitors view Egyptian artist Moataz Nasr

Photo taken on Oct. 21, 2021 shows an artwork in front of the Pyramid of Khafre during an international art exhibition in Giza, Egypt. (Xinhua/Ahmed Gomaa)Photo taken on Oct. 21, 2021 shows an artwork in front of the Pyramid of Khafre during an international art exhibition in Giza, Egypt. (Xinhua/Ahmed Gomaa)

Published : October 23, 2021

By : Xinhua

Rolex a Founding Supporter of One of The World’s Foremost Film Museums #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40007719


Rolex is a Founding Supporter of this pioneering institution a logical development demonstrating the brand’s continuous pursuit and promotion of excellence, its commitment to the art of filmmaking, the preservation of cinema and the transmission of knowledge and skills to future generations

ACADEMY MUSEUM OF MOTION PICTURES

The museum is the first and largest institution in the United States devoted to the history, science and cultural influences of filmmaking. Designed by Pritzker Prize- winning architect Renzo Piano, this hub for film lovers has 50,000 square feet (about 4,650 square metres) of galleries, two theatres, including a 1,000-seat auditorium, an education studio and beautiful public spaces. By illuminating the past, present and future of motion pictures, it aims to advance people’s understanding of cinema through exhibitions, screenings, programmes and collections.

The Rolex Gallery, a permanent, multi-room experience on the museum’s third floor, features “Stories of Cinema”, with special installations that reveal the many aspects of moviemaking – technology, artists, history and social impact – through a variety of diverse and engaging voices that convey the magic of this art form. The legendary Cosmograph Daytona, owned by actor and motor racing enthusiast Paul Newman, is also on display in the museum.

SABAN BUILDING SABAN BUILDING

KEY LINKS TO CINEMA

For almost a century, Rolex and cinema have enjoyed close ties. A kinship that started spontaneously – Rolex watches, a symbol of fortitude and strength, appeared on actors’ wrists in many memorable films – has grown ever stronger over the years, notably through the watchmaker’s active support for film directors, whether established or rising talents.

The close relationship between Rolex and the film industry was formalized in 2017 when the brand signed a partnership agreement with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Rolex thereby became the Academy’s Exclusive Watch and Proud Sponsor of the Oscars® ceremony, for which it also designs and hosts the Greenroom, an elegant space where presenters and guests mingle before going on stage. In 2018, the brand became a sponsor of the Academy’s annual Governors Awards honouring lifetime achievement. Its support of the Academy Museum is part of this broadening relationship. The two organizations are united by a commitment to excellence, a sense of history and a mission to preserve and celebrate the creation of extraordinary works – masterpieces.

BARBRA STREISAND BRIDGEBARBRA STREISAND BRIDGE

PERPETUATING THE CINEMATIC ARTS

Rolex maintains a privileged relationship with some of the world’s greatest filmmakers. These visionaries and masters of technology are constantly pushing back the limits of storytelling and those of cinema itself. Martin Scorsese and fellow film director James Cameron are two towering figures from the world of cinema who currently serve as Rolex Testimonees.

DOLBY FAMILY TERRACEDOLBY FAMILY TERRACE

Scorsese has also passed on his wisdom as a mentor through the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative, which pairs young artists with masters in their discipline for a period of creative collaboration. The initiative embodies the brand’s commitment to transmitting knowledge, a key element of Rolex’s Perpetual spirit, which is based on humankind’s infinite potential, the determination to push back the frontiers and to make constant progress. Other mentoring directors have included Alfonso Cuarón and Spike Lee, both of whom were invited to share their craft at virtual events staged by the museum and who bring their own Oscar-winning work closer to the public.

“Rolex has been linked to the world of cinema for decades, from appearances of its watches in iconic films to the brand’s support for young filmmakers through its mentoring programme,” said Arnaud Boetsch, Rolex Director of Communication & Image. “The relationship between the brand and the film industry was formalized in 2017 through our partnership with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). There’s a natural fit between Rolex, AMPAS, the museum and the world of cinema. We are united in our common search for excellence, in always pushing the limits, reinventing our industries and being a source of inspiration for people and society.”

To Find Out More About Rolex and Cinema Go To

https://www.rolex.com/world-of-rolex/rolex-and-cinema/making-of-a-masterpiece.html

Published : October 19, 2021

Bangkok’s art scene in the pandemic era #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40007659


The Bangkok Art and Culture Centre (BACC) continues playing an important role in showcasing art in Thailand, the centre’s acting director Luckana Kunavichayanont says.

In an interview with the Nation Thailand, she talks about BACC’s future and the challenges it faced during the Covid-19 lockdowns.

The significance of BACC

When asked if the centre is still necessary for this digital era when art can be exhibited and sold online, Luckana said the centre’s main job is to educate people.

She explained that art pieces are collected and curated to communicate with visitors. Each piece, she said, is contemporary and reflects the current situation.

“It is still necessary to address important issues through an analogue platform,” she explained. “This is something that cannot be done online.”

Also, she said, apart from serving as a space for exhibitions, BACC also holds events, seminars and workshops to educate those interested in art.

BACC during Covid

“The lockdown affected us badly,” she said, referring to the temporary nationwide closure ordered by the government after the arrival of the third wave of infections in April. “Big exhibitions had to be closed after a few weeks of operation. Everything that was planned had to be cancelled or shuffled and we lost a lot of our investment.”

She said apart from exhibitions being shuttered, the centre also lost more than a million baht in revenue as it could not collect rent from shops or event organisers.

Admitting that the closure was inevitable, she said it also helped her and her team to devise a Plan B.

Bangkok’s art scene in the pandemic eraBangkok’s art scene in the pandemic eraBACC held its first virtual exhibition in collaboration with the creators of the A360 virtual platform.

This virtual exhibition showcased Damrong Wong-uparaj’s works, which were initially meant to be displayed in the gallery.

“Damrong’s exhibition won some 4,000 views, which is satisfactory for a first virtual showcase,” she said.

Bangkok’s art scene in the pandemic eraBangkok’s art scene in the pandemic era

Artists during Covid-19

Luckana said many artists were unable to create new pieces during the pandemic because they could not leave home to seek inspiration. Also, she said, many faced financial problems and had to cut down on the number of pieces they produced.

Though visual artists could work alone and size their pieces in line with their budget, she said performing artists suffered badly. She said that though some presented their performances online, the effect fell flat because there was no live interaction with the audience.

As for depression brought on by the pandemic, she said there was a positive angle when it comes to art, as artists can give their sadness physical form and expression.

Bangkok’s art scene in the pandemic eraBangkok’s art scene in the pandemic era

BACC in the future

Luckana said she believes the centre will flourish because people nowadays, be they young or old, have developed an interest in art as it is far more easily accessible.

“People flooded to the centre when it was allowed to reopen on October 1. That was quite unexpected,” she said. “Yesterday [Wednesday], BACC had more than 4,000 visitors.

“Topics like soft power and creative economy are top talking points nowadays. We are now focusing on the cultural economy. It is really about art and culture,” she said.

Luckana also urged the government to come up with policies that support Thailand’s contemporary art industry and help it grow.

“Many Thai artists earn a living by exhibiting and selling their work outside Thailand. The government plays little or no role in supporting Thai artists,” she said.

By Thanachart Chuengyaempin

Published : October 18, 2021

By : THE NATION

Namibia launches new wildlife conservation management project #SootinClaimon.Com

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Namibia has launched a Human Wildlife Conflict and wildlife crime project that aims to incentivize wildlife conservation through proactive management.

Namibia has launched a Human Wildlife Conflict (HWC) and wildlife crime project aimed at incentivizing wildlife conservation through proactive management of HWC and wildlife crime while concurrently delivering wildlife-based benefits to rural communities in targeted hotspot landscapes.

Speaking at the launch of the project, Environment Ministry executive director Teofilus Nghitila said HWC and wildlife crime are challenges to the country’s conservation of wildlife requiring management and adaptation.

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“Unfortunately, poverty in our rural areas remains a root cause of HWC and wildlife crime thus this project will target generating economic benefits for communities from wildlife related enterprises,” he said.

The project will focus on strengthening the capacities of conservancies, communal farmers and government agencies and more actively plan for, manage and monitor HWC and wildlife crime as well as strengthen the capacities of anti-poaching units and monitoring of high risk/high-value species.

According to Nghitila, the project which will stretch for the next five years is expected to help Namibia prevent and mitigate HWC and wildlife crime.

Photo taken on April 5, 2021 shows elephants in Omaruru, Namibia. (Xinhua/Kaula Nhongo)Photo taken on April 5, 2021 shows elephants in Omaruru, Namibia. (Xinhua/Kaula Nhongo)

Published : October 14, 2021

By : Xinhua

Will Art NFTs replace tangible traditional art? #SootinClaimon.Com

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The peculiar yet astounding market for Art NFTs has seen a 2100% surge in sales, a feat that remains unknown to many.

Mike Winkelmann, an American digital artist, famously know within the industry as Beeple sold his NFT for $69 million on 11th March 2021. This seemingly revolutionary transaction was carried by “Christie’s”, an auction house responsible for the sale of Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi for a whopping $450 million. Beeple’s entry into the all-exclusive Christie’s club had raised one question in particular.

Will Art NFTs replace tangible traditional art?

The answer is quite simple- No. Traditional art aside from providing illustrious pieces of art that capture aspects of history often lost can actually be a great way to swindle your money away from Uncle Sam (or the government of the country you reside in). In defense of NFTs, they can be a great way for crypto whales to avoid paying capital gains tax. However, tangible art opens up a new realm of possibilities.

A wealthy individual may purchase a painting for $1 Million and end up receiving a tax cut of $3 Million because of that painting. By befriending appraisers and dealers, the individual can ensure that their paintings rise in value. The individual can then proceed to donate the now inflated art piece to a museum and receive a tax deduction on the inflated price. NFTs can never truly replace tangible traditional art until it reaps the same benefits, which seems unlikely since Ethereum (Crypto used for buying/selling NFTs) is decentralized.

By Nishant Pratap Singh

Published : October 13, 2021

By : THE NATION

Tuk-tuks become more popular in Lebanon amid taxi fare rise #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40007359


The auto rickshaws, called tuk-tuks, have long been an alternative means of transportation for the low-income Lebanese who cannot afford to take the taxi.

The three-wheeled tuk-tuks have become even more popular in Lebanon recently, due to the continued rise in taxi fares caused by a worsening fuel shortage amid an economic crisis.

A tuk-tuk driver looks for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)A tuk-tuk driver looks for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)

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Passengers wait to take tuk-tuks on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)Passengers wait to take tuk-tuks on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)

Tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)Tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)

Two tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled/Xinhua)Two tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled/Xinhua)

Tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled/Xinhua)Tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled/Xinhua)

Published : October 11, 2021

By : Xinhua

Nepal makes progress in conserving forest, wildlife species #SootinClaimon.Com

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Besides notable progress in forest protection, Nepal has also made efforts in preserving tigers and one-horned rhinos, both endangered species.

Besides notable progress in forest protection, Nepal has also made efforts in preserving tigers and one-horned rhinos, both endangered species.

Nepal has managed to increase forested areas and the population of endangered animals, tigers and one-horned rhinos in particular, in its efforts to preserve biodiversity over the years.

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The forested areas in the country have reached 45 percent of the total land area. “This is a significant jump from less than 30 percent in the early 1990s,” Megh Nath Kafle, spokesperson for the Ministry of Forests and Environment, told Xinhua.

A network of 20 protected areas covers nearly 24 percent of the total forest areas and manages over 243 watersheds, according to the ministry.

Nepali officials and experts attribute the success mainly to the community-based forest management system.

Elephants walk with grass taken from forest in Sauraha, a tourism hub in southwest NepalElephants walk with grass taken from forest in Sauraha, a tourism hub in southwest Nepal

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In 1957, the Nepali government nationalized the privately-owned forest resources and continued to expand governments’ role in forest protection and management till early 1970s. In late 1970s, a community-based forest management system was introduced, and there are over 22,000 forest user groups now across the country which have been proved to be vital in preserving forest resources.

“The preservation of forest resources under the community-based forest management system, the migration of people from hilly areas to plain areas leaving forests to grow, and the increasing use of cooking gas instead of fire woods have all contributed to the growth of the areas covered by forest,” said Prabhu Budhathoki, an expert on biodiversity conservation.

A baby rhino is examined by a doctor at the premises of National Trust for Nature Conservation at Chitwan National Park, Nepal, Jan. 7, 2018. (Xinhua/Sunil Sharma)A baby rhino is examined by a doctor at the premises of National Trust for Nature Conservation at Chitwan National Park, Nepal, Jan. 7, 2018. (Xinhua/Sunil Sharma)

According to the Forests Ministry, Nepal boasts an ecologically diverse landscape which is home to many different species of flora and fauna. The South Asian country has as many as 35 different vegetation types and 118 ecosystems.

“The community-based forest management system has played an important role not only in expanding the forested areas, but also in preserving biodiversity and wildlife in forests managed by community forestry user groups,” said Bharati Kumari Pathak, chairperson of the Federation of Community Forestry Users in Nepal.

She highlighted the preservation of certain species of trees, including Shorea robusta, locally known as Sal, Acacia catechu, locally known as Khair, and Dalbergia, locally known as Sissoo.

For the protection of vulnerable wildlife species, small zoos have been developed inside community forests, she said.

Besides notable progress in forest protection, Nepal has also made efforts in preserving tigers and one-horned rhinos, both endangered species.

When the Nepali government declared in 2018 that the tiger population in the country had reached 235 from 121 in 2009, it put Nepal ahead of other countries on track to meet the international goal of doubling the tiger population by 2022.

In 2010, Nepal, along with other range countries, endorsed the St. Petersburg Declaration on Tiger Conservation. Since then, the country has been conducting a four-year periodic assessment to track the progress toward reaching the national target of 250 tigers.

In April this year, Nepal declared that the number of one-horned rhinos had increased to 752 from 645 in 2015. The Himalayan country is among a few countries where the greater one-horned rhinos occur.

The conservation efforts in both Nepal and India are lauded, as one-horned rhinos were once on the verge of extinction with just 200 living by the 1900s, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

“Nepal has set an example in the conservation of tigers and one-horned rhinos, and is ahead of any other country in increasing the tiger population,” said Budhathoki, a former member of the National Planning Commission. “The international community should help Nepal continue the preservation efforts as the county, despite being one of the poorest in the world, has invested heavily on the preservation of important species.”

Poaching for illegal trade in rhino horns has remained the biggest threat, and Nepal has mobilized its army to fight the poaching, noted Budhathoki. 

Visitors watch a rhino at the Central Zoo in Lalitpur, Nepal, Dec. 10, 2020. (Photo by Sulav Shrestha/Xinhua)Visitors watch a rhino at the Central Zoo in Lalitpur, Nepal, Dec. 10, 2020. (Photo by Sulav Shrestha/Xinhua)

Published : October 11, 2021

By : Xinhua

Population of endangered Przewalskis horses in Xinjiang increases #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40007161


The number of Przewalskis horses in northwest Chinas Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region had grown to 487 by the end of 2020, according to the Xinjiang Wild Horse Breeding and Research Center.

The Przewalski’s horse is believed to be the only wild horse species in existence today. It is listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species and is under first-class national protection.
 

PrzewalskiPrzewalski

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PrzewalskiPrzewalski

A PrzewalskiA Przewalski

A vet checks PrzewalskiA vet checks Przewalski

Staff member Zhang Hefan is seen with a PrzewalskiStaff member Zhang Hefan is seen with a Przewalski

Staff members prepare watermelons for the PrzewalskiStaff members prepare watermelons for the Przewalski

A PrzewalskiA Przewalski

PrzewalskiPrzewalski

A PrzewalskiA Przewalski

Published : October 07, 2021

By : Xinhua