A vast variety of French contemporary dance

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A vast variety of French contemporary dance

A vast variety of French contemporary dance

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 04, 2022

THE NATION

An old friend texted me last month asking for a recommendation for a performance to watch in the ongoing Bangkok’s 24th International Festival of Dance and Music, quite possibly an international performing arts festival with the highest number of “Swan Lake” presented.

Without any hesitance, and knowing that she had watched a few versions of “Swan Lake”, I suggested Ballet Preljocaj’s new version of it. Records have shown that contemporary French choreographers have so much fun with the classics, she agreed and booked her ticket. 

Unlike in Thailand where the definition of contemporary dance is often limited to reinterpretation of classical narratives or styles, French choreographers have a much broader spectrum to work it. Recently, I returned to Festival Montpellier Danse in southern, and sunny, France and enjoyed this variety.

A vast variety of French contemporary dance

For Compagnie Nacera Belaza’s new work “L’Envol”, veteran French-Algerian choreographer Belaza was inspired by the harrowing image of the man falling from the Twin Towers on 9/11.

With the entire Studio Bagouet at the Agora almost always dark and accompanied by vexing soundscape, she created tormenting images of him with her dancers’ movements without any help of other staging techniques. The stark contrast between that sunny afternoon outside and the darkness inside also created anxiety, if not fright, among the audience. Losing both balance and control, the falling man in his life’s last moment seemed to exude calm and graciousness out of his freedom to take control of his life until its very end.

A vast variety of French contemporary dance

A few days later, the audience also had a chance to watch the company’s previous works as the double-bill comprising “L’Onde” and “Le Cercle” was presented at the same venue. Traits of traditional northern African dances were evident in both, so did Belaza’s meticulous control of lighting and sound which again captivated her audience’s perception of the works. In the latter, the two Belaza sisters Nazera and Dalila were almost always synchronized in their repetitive movements that organically responded to the changing beats of the music. In the former, a piece for five dancers whose movements subtly changed, the connection with the audience was stronger. As the choreographer explained that she wanted to “bring the spectator into a state of contemplation, as if in front of the ocean”, the work proved that she indeed walked the talk. No surprise it was honored with Prix de la révélation chorégraphique in 2008. 

A vast variety of French contemporary dance

In traditional European theatres, opera, ballet and orchestra companies shared the same stage and classical ballet performances were accompanied by live performance of the in-house orchestra. The same cannot be said for contemporary dance companies who break free of this structure and so a contemporary dance performance with live music is a special treat.  

In a live art and dance company PLAY’s new work “Empire of Flora” presented at Théâtre la Vignette on the campus of Université Paul Valéry 3, director Michèle Murray put DJ Lolita Montana on downstage left. In creating what she referred to as “a springtime of bodies”, she was inspired by 17th century painter Nicolas Poussin’s illustration of mythological characters’ metamorphoses into flowers. In fact, Montana’s music was not merely accompanying the four male dancers’ vibrant movements, it was interacting or communicating with them, and us the audience, throughout the performance and her strong presence were like the fifth dancer’s. The experience was uniquely spontaneous and unpredictable.

A vast variety of French contemporary dance

At the Hangar Theatre, a black box studio in arena-stage configuration, the audience watched the movements of five fully naked dancers who never stood up yet formed many shapes as they interacted with one another as well as the soundscape, including a few spoken texts. Monochromic yet never monotonous, Eszter Salomon’s “Monument 0.9: Replay” also featured Garth Robert’s set design with mirrored panels above the performance area providing different perspectives of the physical compositions. 

A vast variety of French contemporary dance

At the same venue in end-stage configuration a few days prior, 69-year-old artist Muriel Boulay’s “Danseuse” was a dance monologue in which she recounted in words, movements and images, at a leisurely pace, her professional life which we, dancers or not, all could learn from. Upstage was a bar and downstage a chair and a table with a lamp and a box of her precious keepsakes like pointe shoes, real props which helped illuminating her intriguing life starting from her rhythmic gymnastics training at a very young age, then her admission to the Paris Opera Ballet School when she’s 12 and difficulties for her career such as the fact that she’s 1.74 metres when she’s 16 and considered too tall. Interestingly, Boulay got married, had a child and took classes in Bharatanatyam among others before she became a star performer at the Lyon Opera Ballet, had a spinal cord operation and later joined Jean-Claude Gallotta’s Émile Dubois Group. 

A vast variety of French contemporary dance

In the end, the audience realised that “Danseuse” was not only a French dancer’s touching personal account sincerely delivered but an insightful peek into the development of French contemporary dance.

A vast variety of French contemporary dance

The festival concluded on a, fittingly, celebratory mood as the Choreographic Ensemble of the National Superior Conservatory of Music and Dance of Paris performed the late Dominique Bagouet’s last work “Necesito, pièce pour Grenade” at the open-air Agora Theatre. Bagouet was the founder of Festival Montpellier Danse which, notably, has received strong support from the city from the beginning. The young ensemble matched the piece’s bright and sunny tone with sheer vivacity and could effortlessly handle a variety of dance styles from different cultures. It’s a reminder that amalgamation of arts disciplines has contributed to the development of contemporary dance as well as a sign for its future in this European country marked by freedom of expression.  

A vast variety of French contemporary dance

The 43rd annual edition of Festival Montpellier Danse will return next June. For more details, check out www.montpellierdanse.com. To learn more about the above companies, cie-nacerabelaza.com/en/www.play-michele-murray.com/ and esztersalamon.net/

By Pawit Mahasarinand
Montpellier, France

The writer’s trip would not be possible without kind support of Montpellier Danse’s Maiwenn Rebours and Ambre Martin as well as the French Embassy in Thailand.

Photo: “L’Envol” by Laurent Philippe; “Empire of Flora” by Ronan Muller; “Monument 0.9: Replay” by Amelie Rosier; “Danseuse” by Hugo Mozet; “Necesito” by Ferrante Ferranti
 

THE NATION

Cheek-piercing religious devotees sacred ritual in Phuket

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Cheek-piercing religious devotees sacred ritual in Phuket

Cheek-piercing religious devotees sacred ritual in Phuket

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 02, 2022

THE NATION

Devotees in Thailand’s Phuket Island has resumed a week-long sacred ritual carried out during the annual vegetarian festival after long hiatus and events being scaled back due to the coronavirus outbreak in 2020.

Worshippers from the local Chinese community have their faces pierced or walked over hot coals at local shrines in the name of purification. They also believe that going without meat, sex, and alcohol in the ninth lunar month of the Chinese calendar also helps achieve good health and peace of mind.
 

In Phuket’s downtown on Friday (September 30) hundreds of devotees and worshippers marched in a procession in respect to Chinese gods. Some with their faces pierced with sharp objects say the meaning of the piercing is a symbol of the sinful things they might have said during the off-vegetarian season.

“For me personally, we use our mouths to talk, right? And naturally, it may be speaking of the good or sinful things during the off-season (of vegetarian festival). We may have spoken good or bad things, so the piercing is for us to feel the wrong and sins we’ve committed,” said Patcharaporn Phromchai.

Devotees said that after the procession is done, they do not feel pain but felt like they have done their part to pay respect to the gods and goddesses they worship.

Cheek-piercing religious devotees sacred ritual in Phuket

“I feel normal, I don’t feel tired or anything, I feel just fine. And it doesn’t hurt at all, I don’t feel anything, I can smile and eat too,” Pantila Sae-Lao told Reuters after she has had metal pokers removed from her face.

Some of the most thrilling features of the Vegetarian Festival are the many, oftentimes gruesome, ceremonies held to appease the gods. During the festival, religious devotees, dressed in white to represent observance, walk barefoot over hot charcoal and take part in extreme body piercing rituals, which include piercing one’s cheeks with swords and spears to ward off evil spirits and invite another year of prosperity.

The 9-day Taoist celebration, also known as the Nine Emperor Gods Festival, is observed during September 25 to October 4 this year.

Cheek-piercing religious devotees sacred ritual in Phuket
Cheek-piercing religious devotees sacred ritual in Phuket

THE NATION

New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction

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New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction

New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2022

THE NATION

The bilingual Buddhist tourist attraction of Saraburi Manasikarn will open tomorrow, September 30.

The project, created by the Knowing Buddha Foundation for the Protection of Buddhism, is in honour of the Buddha and aims to cultivate a good conscience among people. It took five years to complete.
 

Manasikarn Hall is separated into two sections.

One features a multimedia exhibition titled “Journey Through the Life of Buddha”, combining images, light and sound and a video with a cinematic feel.

Further down is the “Stupa Hall”, where visitors can pay homage to Buddha’s relics, a Phra Borommalokkanat statue with a lap width of 30 inches and an embroidered Buddha image.

The other section comprises an area for meditation, where visitors can learn about and feel inner peace.

This helps all participants to live a moral life, the meaning of “manasikarn”.

New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction
New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction

All presentations are bilingual (Thai and English), aimed at local and international visitors.

Saraburi Manasikarn is located in the midst of beautiful scenery of Phra Phutthabat Noi Mountain in Kaeng Khoi, Song Khon subdistrict – a 90-minute drive from Bangkok. It is open Tuesday to Friday 10am to 5pm and on weekends 9.30am to 6pm. It is closed on Monday.

The entrance fee for Thais is 20 baht and foreigners 50 baht. Children, students, elders, handicapped people and monks can enter for free.

New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction
New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction
New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction
New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction
New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction
New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction
New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction
New Saraburi Buddhist tourist attraction

THE NATION

Southerners take part in colourful Sat Thai fest

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Southerners take part in colourful Sat Thai fest

Southerners take part in colourful Sat Thai fest

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2022

THE NATION

Thais in southern provinces flocked to temples on Sunday (September 25) to celebrate the annual Sat Thai festival, which is held at the end of the tenth lunar month.

Sat Thai Day is an occasion to make merit by honouring spirits of the season and one’s deceased relatives. Rites and ceremonies vary among different communities.

The ceremony is sometimes referred to by locals as “sending off grandparents into the next life”, and is an activity that boosts community unity.

Southerners take part in colourful Sat Thai fest

According to local beliefs, Sat Thai Day is one on which deceased relatives can come back spiritually to visit their living descendants to receive “merit”, which they can take to their next life.

Southerners take part in colourful Sat Thai fest

On the special occasion, people visit temples and make merit by presenting offerings to Buddhist monks and praying away all bad karma experienced by their deceased relatives, so that they are forgiven and can have a peaceful, happy next life.

Southerners take part in colourful Sat Thai fest

Most temples build an elevated platform on which visitors place extra food as offerings for the deceased who have no relatives. After a while the foods are considered “consumed” by ghosts and therefore up for grabs by ceremony participants, who believe that eating a ghost’s leftovers is considered good luck.

Southerners take part in colourful Sat Thai fest

To make the occasion more entertaining, some temples place the food on top of an oiled pillar instead of a platform, and those who manage to climb and get the food first are considered winners.

Southerners take part in colourful Sat Thai fest
Southerners take part in colourful Sat Thai fest

THE NATION

Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival

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Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival

Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2022

THE NATION

One of the world’s most unique Buddha-related events, the “Um Phra Dam Nam Festival”, is currently being held in Phetchabun province, where it originated.

Um Phra Dam Nam in Thai language means “diving while holding the Buddha’s image”.

Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival

According to local legend, the festival began when a group of fishermen failed to catch fish and were resting on the river’s bank. Suddenly, a rapid current arose, and a golden Buddha idol happened to float by.

The villagers brought the image to the main temple of Phetchabun, but it disappeared mysteriously and was found back at its original spot on the river.

Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival

Since then the locals have celebrated the festival to pay their respects to the Buddha, in the belief that it will bring them happiness, peace and prosperity.

Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival

The annual festival began on September 23 and ends on September 28, and is being organised at four venues — Phetchabun Intrachai Archaeology Hall, Wat Trai Phum, Wat Bot Chana Mara and Phetbura Buddhist Park.

Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival

The highlight of the festival is a parade of the Buddha image, named “Phra Phuttha Maha Thammaracha”, through the city, culminating in the person carrying the idol diving into the river. The event also features performances, activities and merchandise.

Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival

Thanks to the efforts of Phetchabun government agencies, this event has expanded from local to a provincial festival. Provincial agencies also aim to promote this festival among Asean countries in the future.

Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival
Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival
Phetchabun celebrates unique Buddha festival

THE NATION

Thailand-Norway Ties Still Flourishing After 117 Years

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Thailand-Norway ties still flourishing after 117 years

Thailand-Norway Ties Still Flourishing After 117 Years

BY LINE : THE NATION

WED, SEPTEMBER 14, 2022

The Friendship Between Thailand And Norway Began 117 Years Ago When King Rama V Visited Oslo In 1907 As Part Of His European Tour.

The king had travelled around the world, especially in Europe, to promote Thailand as a developing, independent nation. This was after the Kingdom lost a lot of territory, including Laos, in the 1893 Franco-Siamese War, or the Incident of RS 112.

King Rama V visited Norway two years after the Nordic nation became independent from Sweden on October 26, 1905.

Thailand’s Ambassador to Norway Vimolbajra Ruksakiati said that now there are some 30,000 Thais, mostly women, living in the Nordic nation. Most of them live in Svalbard, followed by Oslo and Trondheim.

“Even though the distance between Thailand and Norway is huge, Thais were the first foreigners to visit the area,” she said.

Vimolbajra, who began her mission in Norway in December 2019, said the two countries have been cooperating on various aspects, such as telecommunications, digital farming and clean energy.

She also believes that the two countries can work together to create sustainable clean energy.

“Thailand and Norway have the same targets in tackling environmental issues and pollution,” she said, adding that advanced technology is necessary to make the cooperation successful.

The envoy added that Thailand’s Commerce Ministry was currently negotiating a free trade deal with the European Free Trade Association (EFTA), which is comprised of Norway, Iceland Switzerland and Liechtenstein.

“This will benefit both Thailand and EFTA members as it will be Thailand’s first FTA in Europe,” she added.

Meanwhile, Thailand’s soft power – its cuisine – has been making a mark in Norway for a few years now.

Penpaka (last name withheld), the owner of the restaurant “Benja Siam Syd” in Trondheim, said Norwegians had developed a taste for Thai cuisine.

She said she opened this second branch about a year ago after running her first restaurant, “Benja Siam Midtbyen”, successfully for 10 years. Penpaka moved to Norway with her Norwegian husband 22 years ago.

She said the most popular dishes in her restaurants are “phad Himmaphan” (stir-fried vegetables with roast duck and cashew nuts), “phad Thai” (stir-fried rice noodles) and “phad priew wan” (sweet and sour pork).

Renu (last name withheld), who owns “Thai Restaurant by Renu” in Kristiansund city, also said her food had received a good response from locals.

She has been living in Norway for 28 years and opened the restaurant with her husband some five years ago.

Let’s Listen To Music And Create A Piece Of Art At “Art Inspired By Storytelling”

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Let's listen to music and create a piece of art at "Art Inspired by Storytelling"

Let’s Listen To Music And Create A Piece Of Art At “Art Inspired By Storytelling”

TUE, SEPTEMBER 13, 2022

Thailand Knowledge Park (TK Park) Invites Children, Families, And Anyone Interested In Music And Art To Join The Event “Art Inspired By Storytelling,” A Showcase Of Children’s Works Of Art Inspired By Picture Books On September 17-25.

The event includes a variety of learning activities that encourage children to use their imaginations, such as a display of art pieces created by children designing bags and making small clay cups inspired by the stories “The Rabbit’s Fabric Bag” by Koyama Yoshiko and Kamimoto Kozo and “A Cup for Everyone” by Yusuke Yonezu.

Attendees will also be able to participate in an art workshop where children and families can collaborate to create works inspired by listening to visual stories.

In addition, every weekend throughout the event, a demonstration of Kamishibai, a traditional form of Japanese street theatre in the form of picture card storytelling, will be held to improve children’s storytelling skills.

There will also be concerts to commemorate “Playing for Change Day,” a global event that supports music as a tool for change. And apart from ukulele workshops, on “Playing for Change Day” on September 17, 2022, children from the Khlong Toei Community will demonstrate their art creation skills as well as exhibit their works in a fun-filled art exhibition.

Young people who are interested can attend the event for free from September 17 to September 25, 2022, from 10.30 a.m. to 17.30 p.m. at Open Space, TK Park, 8th floor of CentralWorld in Bangkok. 

Israeli Food Is A Unique Global Melting Pot – How To Get A Taste In Bangkok

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Israeli food is a unique global melting pot – how to get a taste in Bangkok

Israeli Food Is A Unique Global Melting Pot – How To Get A Taste In Bangkok

BY LINE : NEENA ML.

TUE, SEPTEMBER 13, 2022

Falafel, Shakshuka, Pickled Herrings, Schnitzel, Jerusalem Bagels, And Even Greek Salad: These Are The Names Of Dishes That Also Represent The Food Of Israel.

Well, Israel is also a rich melting pot of cuisines from all around the world. The state was established in 1948, but since then Israel has embraced waves of Jewish migrants from all over the globe. New arrivals from Europe, the US, the former USSR, and even neighbouring areas in the Middle East have added fresh “spice” to create a unique flavour of diversity and togetherness.

Israeli food is a unique global melting pot – how to get a taste in Bangkok
There are always “Stories Behind the Dishes”, explained Israeli ambassador Orna Sagiv. “That is why the Embassy of Israel in Thailand organised a cooking workshop at Helena Restaurant to introduce Israel’s unique charm through its unique culinary traditions to the Thai community,” she smiled. Held in cooperation with the Thai Journalists Association, the event saw Bangkok’s press corps rendered unusually silent as they chowed down on rare delicacies.   

Israeli food is a unique global melting pot – how to get a taste in Bangkok

Sagiv is hoping the publicity “will catch the interest of Thai people as our food has so much influence and combinations from around the world, [and this event] will also share our special culture”.

Israeli food is a unique global melting pot – how to get a taste in Bangkok

As participants enjoyed their deep dive into the tastes and aromas of Israeli cooking, the ambassador explained how each dish had blended into the Holy Land’s melting pot. Although these specialities are also known in other countries, Israelis have a unique way of cooking them as each family has its own secret recipe. 

Israeli food is a unique global melting pot – how to get a taste in Bangkok

“Neighbours from different ethnicities would cook their family food and share it in their neighbourhoods,” Sagiv explained. “We add this and that, and our differences become unique, and that’s what makes our Israeli identity.”
The culinary treasures of Israel can be sampled at Helena on Soi Sukhumvit 51 and a handful of other restaurants across Bangkok. 
Shalom!

The Nation
Neena M.L.

Thais get a taste of Israel-style entertainment with comedy ‘Forgiveness’

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In an effort to introduce Israeli entertainment to Thai audiences, the Embassy of Israel hosted a special film night on August 30 to entertain audiences with the comedy “Forgiveness” (Mechila).

Thais get a taste of Israel-style entertainment with comedy ‘Forgiveness’

Explaining why this comedy was chosen, Ambassador Orna Sagiv said: “We were looking for a film that is interesting globally. Something that speaks to the Israeli audience and one that we feel can also speak to the Thai audience. I think ‘forgiveness’ is universal.”

The film played to a full house at SF Cinema in Bangkok’s CentralWorld shopping mall. 

Thais get a taste of Israel-style entertainment with comedy ‘Forgiveness’

The comedy tells the story of two buddies Shual and Nissan, played by actors Guy Amir and Hanan Savyon, who had also written and directed the film. 

The two try to rob a postal bank but things go horribly wrong, with Shaul being collared by police and Nissan escaping with the loot.

Set in southern Israel on the Gaza border, the sound of incoming bombs and sirens add to the drama. 

Three years later, on his release from prison, Shaul is greeted by a newly religious Nissan who seeks his forgiveness, especially in light of the upcoming “10 Days of Awe” – Judaism’s most important holiday that focuses on repentance and forgiveness ending with Yom Kippur. 

Thais get a taste of Israel-style entertainment with comedy ‘Forgiveness’

The uneasy duo then launch a comedic journey hunting for the hidden stash but everything goes wrong, leaving the audience hoping they can find the money and eventually makeup. 

The film was released in 2019, selling more than 300,000 tickets in Israel over five weeks in theatre. It was dubbed a resounding success by the Jerusalem Post, which pointed out that most local films barely sell more than 100,000 tickets despite spending several months in theatre. 

The ambassador, however, believes Israeli films will do better in Thailand. 

“I think not only movies, but also TV series have become very popular, with Netflix offering a big bag of choices. I’m looking forward to Thai audiences enjoying more Israeli series that tell the story of Israel from the ground – something you don’t see in the news,” she said. “Israel has a lot of offer and I really hope the Thai audience gets exposure to that.”

Published : September 06, 2022

By : Stephanie Adair

TIJ launches “Missing Stone” short film at academic seminar on restorative justice’s 20th anniversary to push for “restorative justice” in Thai society

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“Why should I enter this process? Who will want to reconcile with the rogues who killed my husband?” a woman said resentfully. With her life turned upside down in the wake of her husband’s death, this widow could not understand why she should embrace restorative justice and forgive offenders. When she was invited to enter the process, she was full of doubts and resentment.

TIJ launches "Missing Stone" short film at academic seminar on restorative justice’s 20th anniversary to push for “restorative justice” in Thai society

Her reactions were woven into a short documentary film, “Missing Stone”, alongside knowledge, produced by Thailand Institute of Justice (TIJ). The film was first screened in July 2022 at the online academic seminar marking the 20th anniversary of the United Nations’ resolution on basic principles on the use of restorative justice programs in criminal matters. 

Missing Stone ranks among materials used by TIJ to promote understanding and benefits of restorative justice in Thailand.

TIJ launches "Missing Stone" short film at academic seminar on restorative justice’s 20th anniversary to push for “restorative justice” in Thai society

This short film is based on a true story of gangsters hurling a stone at a van and killing its driver. The crime took place in 2004. But resulting legal proceedings concluded in 2018 with offenders admitting their crime, offering compensation, showing remorse, and asking for forgiveness. Both sides (teenagers who committed the crime and the victim’s wife) have finally turned forgiving, becoming a good example of how what seemed impossible could be possible. The lawyer said in the film that, “Who could ever forgive the persons causing her husband’s death? The chance of forgiving was almost zero”. Yet, the film finally shows how restorative-justice process has made forgiveness “possible”. 

TIJ launches "Missing Stone" short film at academic seminar on restorative justice’s 20th anniversary to push for “restorative justice” in Thai society

Restorative justice, which complements conventional justice systems, encourages offenders’ repentance and offerings of recompense. Compensation does not necessarily have to be in the form of money. It may materialize in the forms of giving up unacceptable behaviors and reintegrating into society as quality citizens too. Restorative justice also focuses on healing the emotional wound of victims and compensating them. Moreover, restorative justice seeks corrections that both the wrongdoers and victims have agreed to. Most important of all, restorative justice shall be carried out with the consent of both sides only. 

“Missing Stone” presents well-rounded perspectives towards the equal treatments of humans. As the deceased men could not come back alive, the focus was on deep rehabilitation for his wife. Offenders, meanwhile, were given opportunities to pay for the crime and restore their human potential through restorative justice. At the heart of restorative justice are the all-encompassing rehabilitation of offenders (criminals) and “admission of guilt, repentance, apology, and forgiveness” as restorative justice aims to enable everyone to live peacefully in society. 

Restorative justice can materialize through collaboration and contributions of both parties in the conflict, specialists, relevant officials such as police, lawyers, judicial officials, probations officials, and psychologists, as well as locals. Officials in charge of restorative justice therefore must understand and be able to reach out to communities involved as well. 

The academic seminar marking the 20th anniversary of the United Nations’ resolution on basic principles on the use of restorative justice programs in criminal matters, a part of efforts to promote restorative justice, provided a forum to promote works and activities from TIJ collaborations with relevant partners in the field of restorative-justice promotion in Thailand. 

TIJ launches "Missing Stone" short film at academic seminar on restorative justice’s 20th anniversary to push for “restorative justice” in Thai society
 
“This short documentary film aims to widely promote understanding in restorative-justice arrangements among officials and the audience. TIJ also seeks to advance the policy-based campaign on restorative justice for youth by organizing camps to listen to and reflect youth’s views on the application of restorative justice to Thai educational institutes,” Dr. Phiset Sa-ardyen, executive director of TIJ, said at the opening of the academic seminar. 

“The Faculty of Learning Sciences and Education of the Thammasat University and the Saint Gabriel’s Foundation of Thailand have collaborated with TIJ in the pilot phase of RJ in School. This collaboration is crucial to promote knowledge and understanding among youth and teachers of how to resolve conflicts in their educational institutes,” Prof. Dr. Kittipong Kittayarak, an advisor to TIJ, added.  

The seminar also featured presentations on restorative justice and criminal justice by Prof. Yvon Dandurand, a professor of Criminology & Criminal Justice at the University of Fraser Valley, Canada; Mrs. Prakairatana Thontiravong, a former chairperson of the National Human Rights Commission; Mr. Vongthep Arthakaivalvatee, an advisor to TIJ and a former deputy secretary-general of ASEAN for ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community; and Mrs. Ticha na Nakorn, Director of Ban Kanchanapisek Juvenile Vocational Training Center.

At the seminar, panelists addressing restorative-justice promotion were:

  • Director of “Missing Stone” short documentary film
  • Dean of Faculty of Learning Sciences and Education, the Thammasat University or representative 
  • Chair for education of Saint Gabriel’s Foundation of Thailand or representative
  • Dean of Faculty of Laws, the Chiang Mai University or representative
  • Director-general of the Rights and Liberties Protection Department, the Ministry of Justice or representative 
  • Moderator and presenter of research findings:  Mr. Ukrit Sornprohm, Project Manager – Rule of Law and Criminal Justice) at TIJ

TIJ is determined to propel the application of restorative justice in every judicial stage in Thailand, and also to promote public awareness and understanding of the issue. 

TIJ launches "Missing Stone" short film at academic seminar on restorative justice’s 20th anniversary to push for “restorative justice” in Thai society

“Missing Stone” was available for viewing not just at the academic seminar but also over YouTube via “TIJ Just Right Channel” channel. TIJ hopes that this moving film, which is based on a true story, will empower all relevant parties in driving and applying “restorative justice” to resolve legal disputes and other disputes in judicial process or other sectors of society. 
 

Published : September 06, 2022

By : THE NATION