Namibia launches new wildlife conservation management project #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40007490


Namibia has launched a Human Wildlife Conflict and wildlife crime project that aims to incentivize wildlife conservation through proactive management.

Namibia has launched a Human Wildlife Conflict (HWC) and wildlife crime project aimed at incentivizing wildlife conservation through proactive management of HWC and wildlife crime while concurrently delivering wildlife-based benefits to rural communities in targeted hotspot landscapes.

Speaking at the launch of the project, Environment Ministry executive director Teofilus Nghitila said HWC and wildlife crime are challenges to the country’s conservation of wildlife requiring management and adaptation.

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“Unfortunately, poverty in our rural areas remains a root cause of HWC and wildlife crime thus this project will target generating economic benefits for communities from wildlife related enterprises,” he said.

The project will focus on strengthening the capacities of conservancies, communal farmers and government agencies and more actively plan for, manage and monitor HWC and wildlife crime as well as strengthen the capacities of anti-poaching units and monitoring of high risk/high-value species.

According to Nghitila, the project which will stretch for the next five years is expected to help Namibia prevent and mitigate HWC and wildlife crime.

Photo taken on April 5, 2021 shows elephants in Omaruru, Namibia. (Xinhua/Kaula Nhongo)Photo taken on April 5, 2021 shows elephants in Omaruru, Namibia. (Xinhua/Kaula Nhongo)

Published : October 14, 2021

By : Xinhua

Will Art NFTs replace tangible traditional art? #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40007455


The peculiar yet astounding market for Art NFTs has seen a 2100% surge in sales, a feat that remains unknown to many.

Mike Winkelmann, an American digital artist, famously know within the industry as Beeple sold his NFT for $69 million on 11th March 2021. This seemingly revolutionary transaction was carried by “Christie’s”, an auction house responsible for the sale of Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi for a whopping $450 million. Beeple’s entry into the all-exclusive Christie’s club had raised one question in particular.

Will Art NFTs replace tangible traditional art?

The answer is quite simple- No. Traditional art aside from providing illustrious pieces of art that capture aspects of history often lost can actually be a great way to swindle your money away from Uncle Sam (or the government of the country you reside in). In defense of NFTs, they can be a great way for crypto whales to avoid paying capital gains tax. However, tangible art opens up a new realm of possibilities.

A wealthy individual may purchase a painting for $1 Million and end up receiving a tax cut of $3 Million because of that painting. By befriending appraisers and dealers, the individual can ensure that their paintings rise in value. The individual can then proceed to donate the now inflated art piece to a museum and receive a tax deduction on the inflated price. NFTs can never truly replace tangible traditional art until it reaps the same benefits, which seems unlikely since Ethereum (Crypto used for buying/selling NFTs) is decentralized.

By Nishant Pratap Singh

Published : October 13, 2021

By : THE NATION

Tuk-tuks become more popular in Lebanon amid taxi fare rise #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40007359


The auto rickshaws, called tuk-tuks, have long been an alternative means of transportation for the low-income Lebanese who cannot afford to take the taxi.

The three-wheeled tuk-tuks have become even more popular in Lebanon recently, due to the continued rise in taxi fares caused by a worsening fuel shortage amid an economic crisis.

A tuk-tuk driver looks for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)A tuk-tuk driver looks for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)

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Passengers wait to take tuk-tuks on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)Passengers wait to take tuk-tuks on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)

Tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)Tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled /Xinhua)

Two tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled/Xinhua)Two tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled/Xinhua)

Tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled/Xinhua)Tuk-tuks wait for passengers on a street in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Oct. 8, 2021. (Photo by Khaled/Xinhua)

Published : October 11, 2021

By : Xinhua

Nepal makes progress in conserving forest, wildlife species #SootinClaimon.Com

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Besides notable progress in forest protection, Nepal has also made efforts in preserving tigers and one-horned rhinos, both endangered species.

Besides notable progress in forest protection, Nepal has also made efforts in preserving tigers and one-horned rhinos, both endangered species.

Nepal has managed to increase forested areas and the population of endangered animals, tigers and one-horned rhinos in particular, in its efforts to preserve biodiversity over the years.

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The forested areas in the country have reached 45 percent of the total land area. “This is a significant jump from less than 30 percent in the early 1990s,” Megh Nath Kafle, spokesperson for the Ministry of Forests and Environment, told Xinhua.

A network of 20 protected areas covers nearly 24 percent of the total forest areas and manages over 243 watersheds, according to the ministry.

Nepali officials and experts attribute the success mainly to the community-based forest management system.

Elephants walk with grass taken from forest in Sauraha, a tourism hub in southwest NepalElephants walk with grass taken from forest in Sauraha, a tourism hub in southwest Nepal

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In 1957, the Nepali government nationalized the privately-owned forest resources and continued to expand governments’ role in forest protection and management till early 1970s. In late 1970s, a community-based forest management system was introduced, and there are over 22,000 forest user groups now across the country which have been proved to be vital in preserving forest resources.

“The preservation of forest resources under the community-based forest management system, the migration of people from hilly areas to plain areas leaving forests to grow, and the increasing use of cooking gas instead of fire woods have all contributed to the growth of the areas covered by forest,” said Prabhu Budhathoki, an expert on biodiversity conservation.

A baby rhino is examined by a doctor at the premises of National Trust for Nature Conservation at Chitwan National Park, Nepal, Jan. 7, 2018. (Xinhua/Sunil Sharma)A baby rhino is examined by a doctor at the premises of National Trust for Nature Conservation at Chitwan National Park, Nepal, Jan. 7, 2018. (Xinhua/Sunil Sharma)

According to the Forests Ministry, Nepal boasts an ecologically diverse landscape which is home to many different species of flora and fauna. The South Asian country has as many as 35 different vegetation types and 118 ecosystems.

“The community-based forest management system has played an important role not only in expanding the forested areas, but also in preserving biodiversity and wildlife in forests managed by community forestry user groups,” said Bharati Kumari Pathak, chairperson of the Federation of Community Forestry Users in Nepal.

She highlighted the preservation of certain species of trees, including Shorea robusta, locally known as Sal, Acacia catechu, locally known as Khair, and Dalbergia, locally known as Sissoo.

For the protection of vulnerable wildlife species, small zoos have been developed inside community forests, she said.

Besides notable progress in forest protection, Nepal has also made efforts in preserving tigers and one-horned rhinos, both endangered species.

When the Nepali government declared in 2018 that the tiger population in the country had reached 235 from 121 in 2009, it put Nepal ahead of other countries on track to meet the international goal of doubling the tiger population by 2022.

In 2010, Nepal, along with other range countries, endorsed the St. Petersburg Declaration on Tiger Conservation. Since then, the country has been conducting a four-year periodic assessment to track the progress toward reaching the national target of 250 tigers.

In April this year, Nepal declared that the number of one-horned rhinos had increased to 752 from 645 in 2015. The Himalayan country is among a few countries where the greater one-horned rhinos occur.

The conservation efforts in both Nepal and India are lauded, as one-horned rhinos were once on the verge of extinction with just 200 living by the 1900s, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

“Nepal has set an example in the conservation of tigers and one-horned rhinos, and is ahead of any other country in increasing the tiger population,” said Budhathoki, a former member of the National Planning Commission. “The international community should help Nepal continue the preservation efforts as the county, despite being one of the poorest in the world, has invested heavily on the preservation of important species.”

Poaching for illegal trade in rhino horns has remained the biggest threat, and Nepal has mobilized its army to fight the poaching, noted Budhathoki. 

Visitors watch a rhino at the Central Zoo in Lalitpur, Nepal, Dec. 10, 2020. (Photo by Sulav Shrestha/Xinhua)Visitors watch a rhino at the Central Zoo in Lalitpur, Nepal, Dec. 10, 2020. (Photo by Sulav Shrestha/Xinhua)

Published : October 11, 2021

By : Xinhua

Population of endangered Przewalskis horses in Xinjiang increases #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40007161


The number of Przewalskis horses in northwest Chinas Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region had grown to 487 by the end of 2020, according to the Xinjiang Wild Horse Breeding and Research Center.

The Przewalski’s horse is believed to be the only wild horse species in existence today. It is listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species and is under first-class national protection.
 

PrzewalskiPrzewalski

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PrzewalskiPrzewalski

A PrzewalskiA Przewalski

A vet checks PrzewalskiA vet checks Przewalski

Staff member Zhang Hefan is seen with a PrzewalskiStaff member Zhang Hefan is seen with a Przewalski

Staff members prepare watermelons for the PrzewalskiStaff members prepare watermelons for the Przewalski

A PrzewalskiA Przewalski

PrzewalskiPrzewalski

A PrzewalskiA Przewalski

Published : October 07, 2021

By : Xinhua

Bangkok Art Biennale announces Curatorial Team and International Advisory Committee for the third edition entitled CHAOS : CALM #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/pr-news/life/40006977


Under the theme CHAOS : CALM, the Bangkok Art Biennale 2022 aims to reflect the unpredictable conditions that the world has endured over the past few years, from the COVID-19 pandemic to climate change and socio-political unrest.

Bangkok, 30 September 2021 – The Bangkok Art Biennale Foundation is delighted to announce the Curatorial Team and International Advisory Committee for the third edition of the Bangkok Art Biennale (BAB) which will take place from 22 October 2022 to 23 February 2023 at various locations across the city as well as virtual venues.

Under the theme CHAOS : CALM, the Bangkok Art Biennale will invite international and Thai artists whose works reflect the turbulence, trauma and angst experienced by many during these uncertain times. The past few years may prove to be a critical turning point in human history. In Ancient Greek mythology, Chaos refers to the void state preceding the creation of the universe or cosmos. From this state of chaos, the Biennale hopes to emerge from this dystopian contemporary world to offer a glimpse of clarity and calm through art.

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The 2022 Bangkok Art Biennale Curatorial Team is made up of Prof. Dr. Apinan Poshyananda (Chief Executive and Artistic Director, Bangkok Art Biennale); Nigel Hurst (Contemporary Art Consultant and former Head of Contemporary Arts, The Box, Plymouth); Loredana Pazzini-Paracciani (Independent Scholar and Curator of Southeast Asia Contemporary Art, Bangkok and London); Jirat Ratthawongjirakul (Director of Gallery VER & N22 Art Community, Bangkok); and Chomwan Weeraworawit, PhD (Founder of Mysterious Ordinary, Bangkok and Co-Founder of Philip Huang, NYC).

Bangkok Art Biennale announces Curatorial Team and International Advisory Committee for the third edition entitled CHAOS : CALMBangkok Art Biennale announces Curatorial Team and International Advisory Committee for the third edition entitled CHAOS : CALM

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The Biennale’s 2022 International Advisors include Mami Kataoka (Director at Mori Art Museum, Japan & President of CiMAM); Dr. Yongwoo Lee (Professor, Shanghai University & former President of the Gwangju Biennale Foundation); Dr. Alexandra Munroe (Senior Curator, Asian Arts, & Senior Advisor, Global Arts, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation); Dr. Eugene Tan (Director of the National Gallery Singapore & Singapore Art Museum); and Wang Chen (Deputy General Manager, The China Arts and Entertainment Group & Member of the Expert Committee, China National Art Foundation).

Bangkok Art Biennale announces Curatorial Team and International Advisory Committee for the third edition entitled CHAOS : CALMBangkok Art Biennale announces Curatorial Team and International Advisory Committee for the third edition entitled CHAOS : CALM

“Although the pandemic and ongoing climate crisis have caused grave consequences worldwide, it is our hope that art and creative activities can contribute to economic recovery and the healing process for our communities, as well as offer opportunities for serendipity amidst the current chaotic conditions. Bangkok will once again be a destination for visitors to appreciate art by leading international and Thai artists which will be displayed at various creative spaces, as well as temples and heritage sites. We look forward to a rich display of artworks that reflect on these drastic changes of our time and help navigate the betterment of humankind,” comments Thapana Sirivadhanabhakdi, Founder and Chairman of Bangkok Art Biennale Foundation.

“This year’s Biennale invites artists to interpret their views on the dichotomy of CHAOS : CALM; two concepts that seem to be opposing yet coexist in our daily lives as we face constant confusion, panic as well as hope. Our curatorial team will invite an inclusive range of artists and select those from our Open Call to offer contemplative thoughts during these uncertain times through individual, collaborative or collective works. Moreover, this edition of the Biennale will not only present works at various physical sites in Bangkok but we are excited to launch a series of innovative new virtual venues as well for the global community to engage with BAB 2022,” comments Prof. Dr. Apinan Poshyananda, Chief Executive and Artistic Director of the Bangkok Art Biennale.

“Amidst constant division and conflict in today’s world, the Biennale’s theme of CHAOS : CALM suggests the possibility of coexistence between opposing concepts in a fluid relationship. This ambiguity could be a key perspective to the future which we could offer from Asia. I am very much looking forward to experiencing the Bangkok Art Biennale in 2022,” comments Mami Kataoka, Director at Mori Art Museum, Japan, and President of International Committee for Museums and Collections of Modern Art (CiMAM) and Advisor to Bangkok Art Biennale 2022

For media inquiries, please contact:  

Malisa Milinthangkul (Som)
(+66) 096-593-6654
malisa.m@thaibev.com

Please see the press kit with further information and images here.

Published : October 03, 2021

Two young Rothschilds giraffes debut at Singapore Zoo #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40006895


Two young Rothschilds giraffes make their public debut at the Singapore Zoo on Thursday.

The two Rothschild’s giraffes came from India’s Mysuru Zoo as part of an animal exchange. They belong to one of the most endangered subspecies of giraffes. Fewer than 2,000 of its kind are left in the wild.

Two young RothschildTwo young Rothschild

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Two young RothschildTwo young Rothschild

Two young RothschildTwo young Rothschild

One of the two young RothschildOne of the two young Rothschild

Published : October 01, 2021

Thailand Phil to be featured in international music festival #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/pr-news/life/40006602


Thailand Phil is one of four international orchestras selected to have video performances screened at the 2021 Busan Maru International Music Festival in South Korea.

The Thailand Phil is honored to announce that it has been selected to have video performances screened at the 2021 Busan Maru International Music Festival (BMIMF) in Busan, South Korea. Only three other international orchestras were chosen to participate in this festival: the Gustav Mahler Orchestra of Hong Kong, the National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine, and the Mihail Jora Philharmonic Orchestra of Romania. 


The Busan Maru International Music Festival normally features live performances of internationally-renowned musicians and ensembles. This year, due to the pandemic, it has invited select musicians and ensembles to submit pre-recorded video performances. The performances will be projected at the Busan Cinema Center’s state-of-the-art 4000-seat outdoor theater which boasts the largest outdoor screen in Korea and 7.1-channel surround sound. The videos will also be broadcast on the festival’s YouTube channel. 

Thailand Phil to be featured in international music festivalThailand Phil to be featured in international music festival
Notably, two works that will be performed by the Thailand Phil have Thai origins. Celebration was composed by Dr. Narong Prangcharoen, Thailand’s foremost composer of classical music as well as Thailand Phil’s Music Director and Dean of the College of Music at Mahidol University. Also, Col. Prateep Suphanrojn’s arrangement of the Thai traditional piece, Lao Duang Duean, will be performed.

Other works presented by the Thailand Phil include Brahms’ Clarinet Sonata No. 1, Tchaikovsky’s Overture to 1812, and Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. The Brahms features clarinet soloist Calogero Palermo, Principal Clarinetist of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. All performances are under the direction of Thailand Phil’s esteemed Chief Conductor, Alfonso Scarano.

Thailand Phil to be featured in international music festivalThailand Phil to be featured in international music festival

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These performances are just latest on Thailand Phil’s growing list of international achievements. Maestro Scarano comments, “In my tenure with the Thailand Phil I have seen, day by day, our level of performance elevate to the international standard we have achieved. Our video participation at BMIMF in South Korea is just the latest testament to this. I must genuinely thank all of my colleagues in the Thailand Phil including the musicians, management, staff, and all conductors, most especially our Founding Chief Conductor Gudni Emilsson, that have contributed to our sixteen years of growth.” 


Thailand Phil’s Music Director, Dr. Narong Prangcharoen, echos these sentiments. “I am incredibly proud of what our orchestra has accomplished. We have become one of the leading orchestras in Southeast Asia and have brought positive recognition to Thailand from around the world. Our participation in the BMIMF is a great achievement. It is especially meaningful that, despite the difficulties caused by the pandemic, Thailand Phil still strong and finding new ways to reach our audience as well as expand to new audiences.” 


“The Thailand Phil has become an indispensable part of the culture and life in Thailand,” says Maestro Scarano. “We are excited to soon announce our plans and projects for the 2021-2022 season. The future of the Thailand Phil is bright.” 
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Busan Maru International Music Festival website: www.bmimf.co.kr
YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCDi1i5DYX5D21R3gYFu2nfg

Published : September 24, 2021

Arc de Triomphe in Paris wrapped as art installation #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40006336

Arc de Triomphe in Paris wrapped as art installation


The entire Arc de Triomphe at the top of the Champs-Elysees in Paris is to stay wrapped in fabric for two weeks, an art installation conceived by the late artist Christo and inaugurated on Thursday by French President Emmanuel Macron.

The 50-meter high, 45-meter long and 22-meter wide monument built by Napoleon, is now wrapped head to toe in 25,000 square metres of recyclable silvery-blue fabric and 3,000 meters of red rope.

Workers put the finishing touches on the wrapped Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France, on Sept. 16, 2021. (Xinhua/Gao Jing)Workers put the finishing touches on the wrapped Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France, on Sept. 16, 2021. (Xinhua/Gao Jing)

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Workers put the finishing touches on the wrapped Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France, on Sept. 16, 2021. (Xinhua/Gao Jing)Workers put the finishing touches on the wrapped Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France, on Sept. 16, 2021. (Xinhua/Gao Jing)

People walk past the wrapped Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France, on Sept. 16, 2021. (Xinhua/Gao Jing)People walk past the wrapped Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France, on Sept. 16, 2021. (Xinhua/Gao Jing)

The wrapped Arc de Triomphe is seen reflected in a womanThe wrapped Arc de Triomphe is seen reflected in a woman

Published : September 19, 2021

Mideast in Pictures: Camel racing festival in Saudi Arabia #SootinClaimon.Com

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https://www.nationthailand.com/life/40006016

Mideast in Pictures: Camel racing festival in Saudi Arabia


The third edition of the Crown Prince Camel Festival were held from Aug. 8 to Sept. 11 on the Taif Camel Field in Makkah Province, Saudi Arabia.

Camel racing is a popular traditional sport in the Arab world. Camels good at racing are known for having specific features such as light weight, small palms, large chest size, long legs and long tail.

Camels are seen racing at the Crown Prince Camel Festival held in Taif, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 10, 2021.Camels are seen racing at the Crown Prince Camel Festival held in Taif, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 10, 2021.

Camels are seen racing at the Crown Prince Camel Festival held in Taif, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 10, 2021.

A camel is seen at the Crown Prince Camel Festival held in Taif, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 10, 2021.

A camel is seen at the Crown Prince Camel Festival held in Taif, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 10, 2021.

A camel is seen at the Crown Prince Camel Festival held in Taif, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 10, 2021.

Camels are seen at the Crown Prince Camel Festival held in Taif, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 10, 2021. Camels are seen at the Crown Prince Camel Festival held in Taif, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 10, 2021.

Camels are seen at the Crown Prince Camel Festival held in Taif, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 10, 2021. 

Published : September 12, 2021